Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.ufla.br/jspui/handle/1/38029
metadata.artigo.dc.title: Genetic control of leaf curl in maize
metadata.artigo.dc.creator: Entringer, G. C.
Guedes, F. L.
Oliveira, A. A.
Nascimento, J. P.
Souza, J. C.
metadata.artigo.dc.subject: Agriculture - Climate changes
Water deficit
Maize - Leaf curl
Agricultura - Mudanças climáticas
Déficit hídrico
Milho - Ondulação da folha
metadata.artigo.dc.publisher: Fundação de Pesquisas Científicas de Ribeirão Preto
metadata.artigo.dc.date.issued: 2014
metadata.artigo.dc.identifier.citation: ENTRINGER, G. C.; GUEDES, F. L.; OLIVEIRA, A. A.; NASCIMENTO, J. P.; SOUZA, J. C. Genetic control of leaf curl in maize. Genetics and Molecular Research, [S. l.], v. 13, n. 1, p. 1672-1678, 2014.
metadata.artigo.dc.description.abstract: Among the many implications of climatic change on agriculture, drought is expected to continue to have a major impact on agribusinesses. Leaf curling is an anatomical characteristic that might be potentially used to enhance plant tolerance to water deficit. Hence, we aimed to study the genetic control of leaf curl in maize. From 2 contrasting inbred lines for the trait, generations F1, F2, and the backcrosses were obtained. All of these generations were evaluated in a randomized block design with 2 replicates. Leaf curl samples were collected from 3 leaves above the first ear at the tasseling stage, and quantified by dividing the width of the leaf blade with natural curling against its extended width. The mean and variance components were estimated by the weighted least square method. It was found that the trait studied has predominance of the additive effects, with genetic control being attributed to few genes that favor selection and exhibit minimal influence from the environment. Among the many implications of climatic change on agriculture, drought is expected to continue to have a major impact on agribusinesses. Leaf curling is an anatomical characteristic that might be potentially used to enhance plant tolerance to water deficit. Hence, we aimed to study the genetic control of leaf curl in maize. From 2 contrasting inbred lines for the trait, generations F1, F2, and the backcrosses were obtained. All of these generations were evaluated in a randomized block design with 2 replicates. Leaf curl samples were collected from 3 leaves above the first ear at the tasseling stage, and quantified by dividing the width of the leaf blade with natural curling against its extended width. The mean and variance components were estimated by the weighted least square method. It was found that the trait studied has predominance of the additive effects, with genetic control being attributed to few genes that favor selection and exhibit minimal influence from the environment.
metadata.artigo.dc.identifier.uri: https://geneticsmr.com/articles/2795?quicktabs_1=1
http://repositorio.ufla.br/jspui/handle/1/38029
metadata.artigo.dc.language: en_US
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